Bureaucrats!

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Every time something works, someone will come along to mess it up.

This morning, I visited my endo for my quarterly checkup. Everything is fine, except for one tiny change in our arrangement which my endo announced at the end of the consultation. Apparently, the National Health Insurance (probably thanks to a bored bureaucrat or more likely a group of bored bureaucrats) has decided that effective April 1 doctors cannot issue a script for more than 60 days’ supply of medicine. Previously, my endo regularly issued 90 days’ worth of metformin (plus 10 days’ allowance in case I need to reschedule my checkup due to any unforeseen event), which covered my needs until my next quarterly A1C bloodwork and checkup. It worked perfectly. With the recent change, however, my script will no longer match my quarterly A1c check and I will be required to pay extra visits to my endo just to pick up meds.

Why? Why? Why? I’m sure that in the larger scheme of things there is a reason for the new restriction. But, I’m also sure that whoever thought of this new scheme did not consider the fact that it is a big inconvenience to a lot of patients.

My doctor and I discussed our options.

Option One, in two months, I’ll pick up one month’s supply of medicine and go back one month later for my A1C checkup and to pick up my next two months’ supply. Repeat.

Option Two, in two months, I’ll pick up two months’ supply of meds and go back two months later for my A1C test and the next two months’ supply. Repeat.

Either option demands that I visit my endo the same number of times. But with Option One, I can maintain my quarterly A1C tests, whereas with Option Two I will have only three A1C tests a year, with a total of three months that are not covered by any A1C check. I suppose it’s Option One for me.

Some of you may be thinking, “What’s the problem? It’s just four extra visits to the doctor’s a year to pick up medicine.” Of course, if I had all the time in the world, the extra journeys to the doctor’s is not an issue. But, like most people, I don’t have that luxury, and I’m willing to bet, neither do those bureaucrats should it be their turn to be the patient.

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2 thoughts on “Bureaucrats!

  1. Rick Philips

    Interesting. In the US we are tending to issue longer prescriptions except for opioids. It is fascinating to me that they are doing this for metformin.

    I referred your article to the TUDiabetes blog page for the week of April 18, 2016.

    Reply
    1. runningwithoutsugar Post author

      Hi. I believe it’s not just for metformin but also for insulin. My doctor’s office posted signs saying that scripts are now only for up to 2 months. My doctor also caters to a lot of elderly patients, so having to travel extra times a year just to get meds would be a pain for them – unless this is all a ploy to get the elderly out of their homes. Thank you for referring my post.

      Reply

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