Category Archives: diet

A new chink in my diet

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Rice bowl.

When it comes to food, I consider myself lucky in that I have no allergy or intolerance, apart from lactose. Of course, being diabetic, I have to minimize, if not avoid, carbohydrates (especially simple carbs) to have better control of my blood glucose. That said, I can choose to indulge if and when I wish; of course, with full knowledge of its effects. This is the case with rice. I generally do not eat rice because rice of all sorts, white, brown, red, polished and unpolished, raises my blood glucose really really quickly. But now I have to avoid rice for another reason. It seems that I have developed an intolerance for it.  Continue reading

Being Large

weight-loss-494284_1280I’ve been doing some retail therapy lately and been so thrilled to be able to buy decent tops in Tokyo. A few years ago, even after my weight loss, my choices of blouses in Japan were limited to a handful. These days, though, I have found more shops carrying wonderful Large size tops. What I find remarkable is the fact that I’m now comfortable asking, “Do you have this in Large?” Continue reading

Lunch

Note: Day 5 DBlogWeek. Taking a cue from Adam Brown’s recent post, write a post documenting what you eat in a day!  Feel free to add links to recommended recipes/shops/whatever.  Make it an ideal day or a come-as-you-are day – no judgments either way.  (Thank you, Katy of  Bigfoot Child Have Diabetes for this topic.)

Pardon me for deviating from the topic but I thought this DBlogWeek prompt would be an apt opportunity to answer a question I often receive from friends and strangers, diabetic or not: What do I eat for lunch? I get this question because I live and work in Tokyo, where rice and noodles are among its staples. Since I do not bring my own lunch to the office, many wonder how I manage. Actually, it is not that difficult to find suitable dishes and restaurants in Tokyo, which is among the world’s top food meccas. In most cases, rice is either served in a separate bowl or placed at the bottom of the bowl (as in rice bowls). Instead of describing food options, which I’ve done before (here), I’ll let you see for yourselves some of the reasonably priced choices available at restaurants and food courts near my office.

Western

Another Garb lunchGarb lunchLunch salad

 

 

 

Chinese

Chinese pork dishMabodofuChinese lunch

 

 

 

 

Japanese

Negitorodon

Rice bowl – the rice is separated by dried seaweed

Japanese lunch

Oyakodon

Chicken and egg rice bowl – the rice is under a layer of cooked egg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bento

Thai bentoBeef bentoSalad bento


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarterly A1c

“I’m surprised it’s not any higher. You cannot have your cake and eat it, too, you know.” That was my husband’s reaction to my latest A1c* number. My own reaction was no different – a combination of relief and self-admonition. [* “What’s an A1c?” Please scroll down to the end of this post for a brief answer.]

graph-41423_1280 Continue reading

My exercise-induced sugar levels

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First post-run BG
When I started self-monitoring my blood glucose, I was a zealous tester, testing up to ten times a day. But I tested only for food and not for exercise. Testing for other things meant using more strips, which were not cheap, and pricking more times than my fingers could handle. In addition, I did not consider it necessary because exercise is crucial to controlling diabetes and lowering high post-meal BG level, which I thought meant that exercise automatically gobbled up my BG. But one blood test laid bare my ignorance. Continue reading

Postmortem of a half-marathon

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Although I finished the half-marathon which I ran two weekends ago, I failed to meet the cut-off time. Why? The long and short of it is that I was ill-prepared to meet the challenge. Why?

Continue reading

Slowly but surely

turtle-152080_640A few weeks ago, I’ve had a pleasant surprise. As I was going through my journals, I discovered that I had lost between nine to ten kilograms (the number is still fluctuating) in the past six years. That’s about 1.67 kilograms a year. Of course, I was extremely ecstatic.  Continue reading

The saga of the guinea pig continues

 

Image courtesy of pakorn / FreeDigitalPhotos.ne

Image courtesy of pakorn / FreeDigitalPhotos.ne

First attempt at low carb
I tried low carb a few years ago. I ate around 50 grams a day for the first three months. But due to miserable results, I progressively raised the carbs for the next four months until I was eating around 100 grams and had to accept that my trial was not successful.

The results were not all bad, though. I had two good results, namely, I achieved two consecutive A1cs below 5% and my GP considered taking me off meds. But the good results were overshadowed by the not-so-good ones:

Continue reading

What the guinea pig learned

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The guinea pig
When I was diagnosed in 2007, I had completed my first marathon and I was preparing for my second one. My main concerns were improving my time, keeping injuries at bay, not hitting the wall, and just completing the race. I’ve always been a turtle but one who has ambitions of turning into a hare. The diagnosis threw a monkey wrench into all this because, in addition to performance, I had to start thinking about my blood glucose as well.

How do I train, fuel my runs and maintain energy levels while keeping my blood glucose at an acceptable level?

Continue reading

Type 2 diabetics face a flood of wrong information (again)

Part of my current T2D treatment

Part of my current T2D treatment

Two weeks ago, the New York Times published an article penned by Elisabeth Rosenthal about Type 2 diabetes and its treatment. The article covered how Type 2 diabetics, seen as the new cash cow by the pharmaceutical industry, are being overwhelmed by costly drugs and tests. With the rising number of Type 2 diabetics, the cost of treatment is indeed a timely topic. But the article is also riddled with errors and misconceptions about Type 2 diabetes. More importantly, it places more emphasis on the cost rather than those suffering from the condition.  Continue reading