Tag Archives: Type 2 diabetes

My silly sugar tests

Will scrubbing my lips with a sugar lip scrub affect my blood sugar?

That question popped into my head one morning as I was gently scrubbing my lips. I knew I didn’t have to do a blood check to know the answer but I thought it would an entertaining way to return to regular self-monitoring blood glucose checks.

I have to admit that I’d been complacent with my testing for a while now. I had resolved to get back to SMBG checks to restart my diabetes management but after months of slacking, resuming SMBG tests was not as easy as I thought. I kept forgetting to check at the two-hour mark. Thus, adding an element of silliness and fun may not be a bad idea. So, one morning, a frivolous sugar scrubbing experiment was born. Continue reading

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Can’t move my face

June 9, 2016, Thursday, started out like any other day. As I put on makeup that morning I mapped out my day. Which work assignment do I begin with? Which colleague will most likely pester me with rush work today? Will I do well in my practice Japanese listening test this afternoon? Will it be a good day? Where shall my husband and I go for dinner? As usual, I dropped by Starbucks to get my soy cappuccino to wake me up properly. When I got to the office, I almost immediately began typing away on my computer.

That normal day began to take a different shape around lunchtime. It started with a small discomfort in my left eye, as if there was a grain of sand lodged in it. I attributed it to my contact lens drying up and reached for an eye drop. Continue reading

Bureaucrats!

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Every time something works, someone will come along to mess it up.

This morning, I visited my endo for my quarterly checkup. Everything is fine, except for one tiny change in our arrangement which my endo announced at the end of the consultation. Apparently, the National Health Insurance (probably thanks to a bored bureaucrat or more likely a group of bored bureaucrats) has decided that effective April 1 doctors cannot issue a script for more than 60 days’ supply of medicine. Previously, my endo regularly issued 90 days’ worth of metformin (plus 10 days’ allowance in case I need to reschedule my checkup due to any unforeseen event), which covered my needs until my next quarterly A1C bloodwork and checkup. It worked perfectly. With the recent change, however, my script will no longer match my quarterly A1c check and I will be required to pay extra visits to my endo just to pick up meds.

Why? Why? Why? I’m sure that in the larger scheme of things there is a reason for the new restriction. But, I’m also sure that whoever thought of this new scheme did not consider the fact that it is a big inconvenience to a lot of patients.

My doctor and I discussed our options.

Option One, in two months, I’ll pick up one month’s supply of medicine and go back one month later for my A1C checkup and to pick up my next two months’ supply. Repeat.

Option Two, in two months, I’ll pick up two months’ supply of meds and go back two months later for my A1C test and the next two months’ supply. Repeat.

Either option demands that I visit my endo the same number of times. But with Option One, I can maintain my quarterly A1C tests, whereas with Option Two I will have only three A1C tests a year, with a total of three months that are not covered by any A1C check. I suppose it’s Option One for me.

Some of you may be thinking, “What’s the problem? It’s just four extra visits to the doctor’s a year to pick up medicine.” Of course, if I had all the time in the world, the extra journeys to the doctor’s is not an issue. But, like most people, I don’t have that luxury, and I’m willing to bet, neither do those bureaucrats should it be their turn to be the patient.

A new chink in my diet

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Rice bowl.

When it comes to food, I consider myself lucky in that I have no allergy or intolerance, apart from lactose. Of course, being diabetic, I have to minimize, if not avoid, carbohydrates (especially simple carbs) to have better control of my blood glucose. That said, I can choose to indulge if and when I wish; of course, with full knowledge of its effects. This is the case with rice. I generally do not eat rice because rice of all sorts, white, brown, red, polished and unpolished, raises my blood glucose really really quickly. But now I have to avoid rice for another reason. It seems that I have developed an intolerance for it.  Continue reading

Singing may be detrimental to my diabetes

spaghetti-31784_1280I had recently performed in a summer recital which my teacher mounts annually for her students. Although preparing for the recital can be stressful, I look forward to performing every year. This year, I was especially excited because I would be singing a really famous Italian aria which for years my husband had been asking me to learn. My excitement spilled over to what I would wear, what make-up I would use, and even to what color I would paint my nails. I actually had my nails done, something I’d never even bothered to do in the past recitals. I wanted to look my best. Continue reading

Being Large

weight-loss-494284_1280I’ve been doing some retail therapy lately and been so thrilled to be able to buy decent tops in Tokyo. A few years ago, even after my weight loss, my choices of blouses in Japan were limited to a handful. These days, though, I have found more shops carrying wonderful Large size tops. What I find remarkable is the fact that I’m now comfortable asking, “Do you have this in Large?” Continue reading

So What!

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My peaceful hiatus from the online diabetes community was disturbed by the uproar started by the misleading, ill-informed and insensitive tweet by the CEO of Crossfit and the equally misleading, ill-informed and insensitive responses to that tweet from certain members of the diabetes community. For those who are not aware, let me summarize. The inconsiderate and ignorant CEO tweeted the image “Coca-Cola Open Diabetes” which clearly insinuated that sugar causes diabetes and that therefore those who drink too much Coke (or have too many sugary things) brought diabetes upon themselves. This tweet drew indignation from the diabetes community. Sadly, the indignation included the equally inconsiderate and ignorant response “Learn the difference between Type 1 and Type 2” from an alarmingly large number of Type 1 diabetics (represented by a pop music personality) or their parents.

Like many, I was incensed with the Coke-related tweet. Continue reading

D Blogging

Note: Day 6 of DBlogWeek. If you have been blogging for a while, what is your favorite sentence or blogpost that you have ever written?  Is it diabetes related or just life related?  If you are a new blogger and don’t have a favorite yet, tell us what motivated you to start sharing your story by writing a blog?  (Thank you Laddie of Test Guess and Go for suggesting this topic. I don’t think I’ve ever written anything that I can say is my all time favorite. Often I read someone else’s article, essay, novel, blog post, or interview, and I think “Man, I wish I had written or said that!” It took me a while to garner enough courage to blog. Envy and frustration made me do it. cloud-709095_1280 Continue reading

Lunch

Note: Day 5 DBlogWeek. Taking a cue from Adam Brown’s recent post, write a post documenting what you eat in a day!  Feel free to add links to recommended recipes/shops/whatever.  Make it an ideal day or a come-as-you-are day – no judgments either way.  (Thank you, Katy of  Bigfoot Child Have Diabetes for this topic.)

Pardon me for deviating from the topic but I thought this DBlogWeek prompt would be an apt opportunity to answer a question I often receive from friends and strangers, diabetic or not: What do I eat for lunch? I get this question because I live and work in Tokyo, where rice and noodles are among its staples. Since I do not bring my own lunch to the office, many wonder how I manage. Actually, it is not that difficult to find suitable dishes and restaurants in Tokyo, which is among the world’s top food meccas. In most cases, rice is either served in a separate bowl or placed at the bottom of the bowl (as in rice bowls). Instead of describing food options, which I’ve done before (here), I’ll let you see for yourselves some of the reasonably priced choices available at restaurants and food courts near my office.

Western

Another Garb lunchGarb lunchLunch salad

 

 

 

Chinese

Chinese pork dishMabodofuChinese lunch

 

 

 

 

Japanese

Negitorodon

Rice bowl – the rice is separated by dried seaweed

Japanese lunch

Oyakodon

Chicken and egg rice bowl – the rice is under a layer of cooked egg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bento

Thai bentoBeef bentoSalad bento


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unsticking a stigma


Note: Day 4 of DBlogWeek. Today let’s talk about changes, in one of two ways.  Either tell us what you’d most like to see change about diabetes, in any way.  This can be management tools, devices, medications, people’s perceptions, your own feelings – anything at all that you feel could use changing.  OR reflect back on some changes you or your loved one has seen or been through since being diagnosed with diabetes.  Were they expected or did they surprise you?

weeping-41879_1280I would like to rid Type 2 diabetes of the social and moral stigma it carries.

Type 2 diabetes is not a moral failing. It is not a result of lack of willpower and resolve. It is not God’s punishment for gluttony and sloth.

Continue reading